TEENS AND FAMILIES | Page 7 | Center on Addiction

TEENS AND FAMILIES

Sleep-Deprived Teens are at Increased Risk of Substance Use

Recent research has shined a light on the potential adverse cognitive and health effects of disrupting the natural sleep cycle of teens, including an increased risk of obesity, depression, automobile accidents, and poor academic performance. Now, an emerging body of research is providing yet another reason to ensure that teens get enough sleep: the significant link between sleep patterns during middle and high school and the risk of substance use.

Cheers for CVS Becoming Tobacco Free, But Jeers for Point-of-Sale Advertising at Other Tobacco Retailers

On October 1, 2014, CVS Health went tobacco free. This is a huge step forward when it comes to tobacco prevention. But it also brings to light the reality that the majority of tobacco sales take place at convenience stores, supermarkets, tobacco stores and beer, wine and liquor stores, not at drugstores. So while this change is monumental, we still have a lot of work to do when it comes to combating the tobacco epidemic at the point-of-sale.

Old Enough to Vote but Not to Smoke

Despite objections that 18 year olds should be treated like adults and allowed to smoke, local governments are trying to prevent the next generation of young adults from becoming victims of the tobacco industry. Last year Chicago banned the sale of all flavored tobacco products, which are marketed to attract young customers, within 500 feet of schools. In October of 2014, the city council just down the road in Evanston, Ill., joined a growing list of cities in banning tobacco sales to anyone under the age of 21. 

CASAColumbia Approved for $2.1 Million Research Funding Award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

A research team at CASAColumbia was recently awarded funding by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), to study the most effective ways to enhance healthcare outcomes among adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and related behavioral problems, including substance use. The Buzz sat down with the project's principal investigator, Aaron Hogue, Ph.D., Director of Adolescent and Family Research, to discuss the new grant and learn more about why this research is so critically important.

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids Wins Award for Important “Mind Your Meds” Campaign

CASAColumbia applauds the well-deserved award recently received by The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids for their national campaign on medicine abuse. Together with Hill Holliday, The Partnership’s “Mind Your Meds” campaign won the Gold Lion Award at the first Cannes Lions Health festival.

The U.S. is in a time of crisis with regard to the use and misuse of and addiction to opiates, including both prescription medications like Oxycontin and street drugs like heroin. Teenagers and young adults are among the most vulnerable. In the northeast, where many experts consider us to be in the midst of an opiate epidemic, overdose is the leading cause of death among young people. It surpasses the other leading causes of youth death (accidents, suicide and homicide), all of which are also associated with substance use.

The use and misuse of ADHD medication

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the medicines (for example Adderall, Ritalin, Concerta) doctors prescribe to treat it has been a hot topic in the news for months now. These medications can be extremely helpful for children and adolescents who have received a comprehensive assessment and accurate diagnosis of ADHD. However, misdiagnosis, over-prescribing, and diversion are significant risks.

Public policy insight: the changing face of teen substance use

Today, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) released their annual Monitoring the Future report, which measures substance use and attitudes among the nation’s 8th-, 10th- and 12th-graders. The 2013 report showed continued progress in the decline of some forms of substance use among teens, namely with alcohol, cigarettes and prescription opioids. However, according to the report, while the use of these substances has declined, teen use of marijuana, prescription stimulants and other tobacco/nicotine products has increased.

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