The Buzz | The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse


Welcome to The Buzz—The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse's online conversation about addiction and substance use.

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Teenage girl sitting in the classroom and writing a test on a piece of paper.

When it comes to teenagers, fads may come and go, but parents should still make themselves aware of the latest substance use trend taking over middle and high schools: “JUULing.”

Doctor practicing acupuncture treatment to the patient's arm

First developed thousands of years ago, the traditional Chinese medicine technique acupuncture is still employed around the world today to help people suffering from various ailments like back pain, headaches, fibromyalgia and post-operative nausea. One specific type of acupuncture is even being used to treat what many consider among our nation’s biggest health problems: addiction.

Pills and prescription pad

Surplus prescription medications can pose a significant risk to both adults and children. As stated by the National Safety Council, “the largest source of easily available and ‘free’ abused medications are the billions of prescription pills readily accessible in home medicine cabinets.” The best way to prevent prescription drug misuse, including the misuse of potentially deadly opioids, is by properly storing and ultimately disposing of excess medications. Unfortunately, in our latest poll , we asked, “do you currently have leftover or excess prescription medications in your home?” and half of all respondents replied “yes.”

98% Pure Meth background

Just last week, The New York Times reported that United States border agents are seizing “10 to 20 times the amounts [of this drug] they did a decade ago.” The drug in question: methamphetamine. As our national consciousness has been  laser-focused  on the opioid epidemic, hundreds of thousands of people are struggling with addiction to this drug, commonly referred to as “meth,” “ice,” “crank,” “crystal,” “fire,” “glass,” or “speed.”

Search for fraud

While we wish it weren’t so, there is no easy cure for opioid addiction. Unfortunately, in the face of our nation’s opioid epidemic, many opportunistic entities have popped up trying to peddle products that offer a quick fix to this chronic disease. Following a rise in the online advertising of fraudulent “miracle cures” for opioid withdrawal and addiction, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) partnered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to put these misleading and manipulative marketers on notice. To learn more, we spoke with Mamie Kresses, a senior attorney in the FTC’s Division of Advertising Practices.

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