The Buzz | The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse

Blog

Welcome to The Buzz—The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse's online conversation about addiction and substance use.

Blog Listing

In 2015, only about 11 percent of the approximately 22 million people who needed addiction treatment received it. And though increased access to treatment is necessary, it’s not enough to close this treatment gap. While barriers to accessing treatment – like the high cost of treatment and the limited number of treatment facilities and providers – may explain why many people who need treatment don’t receive it, the reality is that many experiencing addiction do not feel motivated to seek help. 

As the debate over the Better Care Reconciliation Act continues, there has been a pivotal turn in many politicians’ perspectives on health care – even those who previously opposed Obamacare. There may be one reason to explain this shift: the opioid epidemic. There are many pressing issues concerning health care, including increased costs. But the opioid epidemic, which some experts believe may kill over 90,000 Americans a year in the near future, is by far the most significant. 

Quest Diagnostics’ annual drug testing data for 2016 revealed the highest rate of positive workforce drug tests in 12 years. Given the persistent opioid epidemic, this may not sound surprising. Except, the data show that the increase in positive drug screens were not attributed to heroin or prescription opioids, where rates remained stable or dropped. Instead, there were increases in positive drug screens for cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamines. Notably, the data reflected that positive drug screens for marijuana were higher than the national average in Colorado and Washington, two states that have legalized recreational marijuana.

 

One of the major problems of today’s deadly opioid epidemic and persistent addiction crisis is lack of access to effective treatment. One of the major reasons people are unable to get treatment is the apparent lack of coverage by their health insurance plan. This continues to happen despite the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (Parity Act), a federal law that requires equitable insurance coverage for addiction treatment by most health plans. 

Dr. Sabet, Director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida and Co-Founder, President and CEO of Smart Approaches to Marijuana, spoke during our Addiction Speaker Series about the impact of marijuana legalization in our country. Research shows that the vast majority (91 percent) of calls to poison control centers for unintentional exposure to marijuana edibles among young children come from states like Colorado, Washington, and Oregon, which have legalized and marketed marijuana. National data also indicate that Colorado ranks highest in rates of adolescent marijuana use – higher than the national average. States like Colorado, Washington, and Oregon also rank lowest in measures of adolescent perceptions of risk from smoking marijuana.

We had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Sabet about his work. 

Newsletter Additional Information

Newsletter Additional Information

Thank you for subscribing

This information will be used to better customize your experience and help inform future tools and features on our website.

Additonal Information
WHICH OF CASAColumbia's ISSUES INTEREST YOU?
Profession