Heroin | Center on Addiction

Heroin

The Hidden Killer: Fentanyl

For years, we’ve been telling parents to talk to their children about the dangers of prescription drug misuse, because these conversations can help reduce teen substance use and prevent addiction. Now there is a new reason for parents to have “the talk”– to warn them about the dangers of fentanyl, a deadly opioid being laced in drugs or substituted for other commonly abused opioids like heroin, OxyContin, Vicodin and Percodan.

 

A place to legally inject heroin – does this really exist?

Injection drug use presents a special challenge for public health – those who inject drugs become severely addicted, often avoid the health care system, and are at high risk for multiple negative health outcomes, including infection, overdose and death. Some solutions fall under the umbrella of harm reduction, a set of strategies targeted at reducing the negative consequences associated with drug addiction. One harm-reduction approach being considered is called a supervised injection facility (SIF) – a legally sanctioned setting where individuals can inject previously obtained drugs (such as heroin and other opioids) under medical supervision. 

HBO Producer, Lise King, Talks to us About the “Heroin: Cape Cod, USA” Documentary

Prescription opioid and heroin addiction, overdose and deaths have been serious problems for many years. As the crisis more recently expanded to suburban and urban communities, it has generated significant media and political attention. Documentaries are being developed to raise awareness of the epidemic and its devastating impact on families in a way that is relatable to viewers. A recent example is the HBO documentary “Heroin: Cape Cod, USA,” which offers a graphic portrayal of heroin addiction by following the lives of eight young people addicted to the drug. 

Vivitrol: An Underused Medicine in the Opioid Epidemic

As many people across the U.S. continue to struggle with opioid addiction, several lifesaving medicines remain out of reach because of their cost or availability. In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Vivitrol – a once-per-month injection that blocks the effects of opioids and reduces cravings. Vivitrol is an injectable form of the medication naltrexone, which is taken orally several times per week, and has been used to treat opioid addiction for over 20 years. 

Newsletter Additional Information

Newsletter Additional Information

Thank you for subscribing

This information will be used to better customize your experience and help inform future tools and features on our website.

Additional Information
WHICH ISSUES INTEREST YOU?
What brought you to our website?