February | The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse

February

98% Pure Meth background

Just last week, The New York Times reported that United States border agents are seizing “10 to 20 times the amounts [of this drug] they did a decade ago.” The drug in question: methamphetamine. As our national consciousness has been  laser-focused  on the opioid epidemic, hundreds of thousands of people are struggling with addiction to this drug, commonly referred to as “meth,” “ice,” “crank,” “crystal,” “fire,” “glass,” or “speed.”

Search for fraud

While we wish it weren’t so, there is no easy cure for opioid addiction. Unfortunately, in the face of our nation’s opioid epidemic, many opportunistic entities have popped up trying to peddle products that offer a quick fix to this chronic disease. Following a rise in the online advertising of fraudulent “miracle cures” for opioid withdrawal and addiction, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) partnered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to put these misleading and manipulative marketers on notice. To learn more, we spoke with Mamie Kresses, a senior attorney in the FTC’s Division of Advertising Practices.

Image of actual kratom pills with a faux prescription logo.

“Natural,” “mild and pleasant,” “a solution for opioid addiction;” these are a few of the ways the substance kratom has been described in the media. Yet, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has long warned users about the “deadly risks” associated with consuming this herb, and just today issued a statement noting it should be treated no less seriously than other addictive opioids. So, what is kratom, why is it growing in popularity and what risks does it pose to users?

Newsletter Additional Information

Newsletter Additional Information

Thank you for subscribing

This information will be used to better customize your experience and help inform future tools and features on our website.

Additonal Information
WHICH OF CASAColumbia's ISSUES INTEREST YOU?
Profession