The Buzz - A Blog About the Disease of Addiction | The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse

Blog

Welcome to The Buzz—The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse's online conversation about addiction and substance use.

Blog Listing

School administrators are charged with ensuring a safe, supportive, and healthy school environment where children can learn and reach their full potential. This includes taking measures to prevent tobacco, alcohol and drug use among students. Historically, schools turned to prevention programs like D.A.R.E., but research shows that D.A.R.E. doesn’t work. Instead of supporting the implementation of proven prevention practices, some administrators have turned to a more punitive and controversial approach: drug testing students.

New trends continue to emerge in the food and beverage arena, but this one caught us by surprise. It’s called breathable alcohol and is essentially a cocktail cloud that causes people to become intoxicated 40 percent faster than a standard drink. 

As part of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse Speaker Series, in which leading experts present their latest findings, Stephen Ross, MD, Associate Professor and Director of Addiction Psychiatry at NYU Medical Center, discussed his latest findings on using psilocybin to reduce the psychological effects and severe stress that many advanced stage cancer patients face. We spoke with Dr. Ross to hear a little bit more about this fascinating area of research.

Welcome to Five Minutes With, where we take a few moments to get to know the staff at The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Today we’d like to introduce Molly Bobek, L.C.S.W., Senior Research Associate.

A new year calls for new beginnings and new conversations. Some of the more difficult conversations are the ones that parents have with their children pertaining to alcohol and drug use. Nevertheless, they are important talks to have. Research tells us that teens who are educated about the risks of drugs from their parents are less likely to use. In fact, most teens credit conversations with Mom and Dad as their main reason for deciding not to do drugs. 

Newsletter Additional Information

Newsletter Additional Information

Thank you for subscribing

This information will be used to better customize your experience and help inform future tools and features on our website.

Additonal Information
WHICH OF CASAColumbia's ISSUES INTEREST YOU?
Profession